The Revised Romanisation of Korean

Sometimes abbreviated to RR.

Medials

The vowels in Korean are very consistently pronounced, unlike in English. Consequently, their romanisation is fairly straightforward. The six basic vowels are romanised in the following way:

a
eo
i
o
u
eu

The revised romanisation differs noticeably from the McCune-Reischauer romanisation due to the prominence of double-letter representations like 'eo' and 'eu'.

The two double-vowels in Korean are romanised in the following way:

ae
e

The diphthongs in Korean are constructed very regularly, which also makes their romanisation very straightforward.

ya
yeo
yo
yu
yae
ye
wa
wo
oe, oi
wi
ui
wae
we

Whilst officially, is written as 'oe', it is often written as 'oi' to avoid misrepresentation for people who don't know any Korean.

It's worth noting that sometimes is written 'we' for simplicity, though this is technically incorrect.

Initials and Finals

The consonants in Korean are sounded differently depending on where they're found within a word. This quality of the language is included into the romanisation. For the Korean letters below, the first English letter denotes the normal romanisation of the consonant, and the second denotes how the letter is romanised when found at the end of a word or when the following syllable begins with a consonant.

g, k
kk
k
d, t
tt
t
b
pp
p
j, t
jj, t
ch, t
s, t
ss, t
r, l
m
n
-, ng
h, -

The pronunciation changes associated with one consonant following another between syllables has some exceptions, which can be identified in the table below.

In the following table, the Korean letters along the top denote the final consonant of the first syllable, and the letters down the right denote the initial consonant, if any, of the second syllable. The pronunciation changes that are exceptions are coloured red.

k t p m n ng l
kg tg pg mg n-g ngg lg g
k-k tk pk mk nk ngk lk k
kd td pd md nd ngd ld d
kt t-t pt mt nt ngt lt t
kb tb pb mb nb ngb lb b
kp tp p-p mp np ngp lp p
kj tj pj mj nj ngj lj j
kch tch pch mch nch ngch lch ch
ks ts ps ms ns ngs ls s
ngm nm mm mm nm ngm lm m
ngn nn mn mn nn ngn ll, nn n
g d, j b m n ng- r -
ngn nn mn mn ll, nn ngn ll r
kh, k th, t, ch ph, h mh nh ngh lh h

Compound Finals

ks, k
ps, p
nj, n
nh, n
k
l
l
p
m
l
lh, l

Why do we favour this romanisation on the website?

It's considerably more straightforward to type words in this romanisation than in the popular alternative, McCune Reischauer.

Korean Date

The date today is,

4350 년 1 월 3 일 (4350, Month 1 Day 3) (28 February 2017 CE)

This is the date according to the traditional lunisolar calendar of Korea. (Note that this is not an authoritative calculation; I’m still working on the details.) The years count back to the legendary founding of Korea by 단군 왕검 (Dan-gun Wanggeom).